Tag Archives: Food

OK there are just SO MANY options for food and drink within 5 mins of the venue…

You are spoilt for choice when it comes to food and drink in Bristol, the Watershed itself has a delicious menu, and stepping outside there are restaurants and cafes all around the harbourside. Slightly further afield (by “further”, I mean less than 10 minutes walk) there are restaurants, cafes and pubs as you walk up Park Street – the hill up towards Clifton. Walking in the other direction takes you to St Nick’s Market – a covered market with an avenue dedicated to food stalls; again, the way there (Baldwin Street) has many places to choose from too.

With so many to choose from, I’ll single out that are known to have tasty offerings.

Continue reading OK there are just SO MANY options for food and drink within 5 mins of the venue…

An exciting few weeks at the Food Standards Agency

It has been an exciting few weeks at the Food Standards Agency:

Open by default

On 28th January our board set us on an open by default path https://president.com/zbzdczunpvsu/a-data-driven-fsa.

Future of food regulation

The following week there was a public event about the future of food regulation (see https://storify.com/drsiant/the-future-of-food-regulation,  and we published our principles https://registration.livegroup.co.uk/regulating-the-future/content tabs/?ctid=824.

Open Data Camp

We are pleased to be supporting Open Data Camp 3 in May.

Open Data Camp 3 teaser

Purpose of this blog

A call for help linking these three distinct themes. There could be a key role for Open Data in the future of food regulation. There are many facets of this and we are keen to get people to help us develop some ideas.

As is customary, I will be at (and again involved with organising) Open Data Camp – but this time I am reaching out to the community to do some thinking before the event.

Share some ideas: from crowdsourcing to data standards – we need your help to explore the possibilities. After all, we all have to eat at least a few times every day.

Open Data Camp Manchester – Last minute notes for attendees

Jamie Whyte

Open Data Camp is in Manchester on the 10th and 11th October 2015, and we are one of the organisers. Here are some last minute notes for attendees – about WiFi, the pub, and timings.
open data camp logo

Open Data Camp (Manchester) – Last minute notes for attendees

We’re really excited about Open Data Camp 2. To get the most out of the two days, we wanted to set out some of the logistics, and other things we think you might want to know.

THERE MAY STILL BE A SMALL NUMBER OF TICKETS AVAILABLE. IF YOU FANCY IT – ONE DAY OR TWO, COME THIS WAY

Timings Please?

Doors will open on both days at 9:00am. Register, log on to WiFi, visit the sponsors stands, network, have coffee, etc, until 10:00am, when the pitching will take place. First session is expected to start at 10:30 and there will probably be two sessions in the morning, each of around 50 minutes, then lunch, then three sessions in the afternoon, with a half five finish. (This is all subject to change, dependant on many factors)

What’s the deal with food?

There will be pastries on arrival, and tea and instant coffee available throughout the day. Unfortunately, because of budgetary constraints we cannot offer lunch. There is, however, a wide range of eateries around the Shed – cheap and big-portions – vegetarian, vegan, halal etc. These will be detailed on a map on your lanyard. Pancho Burritos have offered a 15% discount to lanyard wearers, and the Enrique (the owner) has offered to ‘cook something up special’(!).

How do I unconference?

Open Data Camp is a two day unconference. This means that we have no idea what will go down. For those who have not been to an unconference before, the idea is that attendees set the agenda on the day, by pitching to run sessions. People can then choose which sessions to go to.

Please please please if you have any kind of an idea for a session, don’t be afraid to pitch it. In February we had all sorts of sessions, from open data horror stories, through open addresses, to homelessness.

If you fancy getting your hack on – pitch it as a session, and people can join in if they fancy it – there are really no constraints (as long as there’s no outraging public decency).

The final thing we would REALLY appreciate is if people could blog and tweet over the two days. Matt from Drawnalism will be there to draw what’s going on, but the more chatter about it there is, the better. Twitter hashtag is #ODCamp.

What about the pub?

We’ll be hitting the Sandbar both evenings –Friday and Saturday. We’ve not booked a room or anything, so we’ll have to slum it with non-open data types. From there – Manchester is your oyster – the bearded hipsterland that is the Northern Quarter, mix it up with the students down Oxford Road, or go for the hedonistic paradise of Canal Street.

Will there be WiFi?

Yes, there will be WiFi – you will be issued a sticker with your username and password on arrival.

How do I get there?

The venue is the Shed – a great space in the shadow of the Mancunian Way. For directions – see here.

Anything else?

Remember that it’s YOU that made ODCamp 1 a success, and its you that’ll make ODCamp 2 a success. If you need help with anything over the weekend, the people in green t-shirts are slightly more likely to know what’s going on. We, the organisers, are very much looking forward to seeing what happens – we hope you are too.

Food data to go

interactive-data-hr

We know from past hackathon events that the attendees are a talented hive of production and we want to help you to make more honey. At the Food Standards Agency, we have a healthy appetite for openness. This is because we’re an independent government department with no specific minister. It means openness and transparency are in our DNA.

We publish open data about food.

So let’s cook

We’re excited to be part of the Open Data Camp and have a series of digital offerings to serve up. If you’re into making stuff, we’re keen for you bring your experience to the table and use our data to make a new innovative application and that can include social media.

Below are details of our main datasets and some examples of where to find existing applications. These might inspire you.

Do let us know how you get on @foodgov and use #opendata. Our @drsiant will be at the event and me, @davidberrecloth, via Twitter.

  1. UK food hygiene ratings API (JSON and XML format)

 

fhrs5

About the geo-coded data

The food hygiene ratings given to restaurants, pubs, cafés, takeaways, hotels and other places consumers eat, as well as supermarkets and other food shops. A food business’s rating reflects the standards of food hygiene found on the date of inspection or visit by the local authority.

Get data

Our API 2.0, which includes calls to the server, can query and return data (not the whole dataset though):

http://api.ratings.food.gov.uk/help

A more basic API as well as static XML files by local authority:

http://ratings.food.gov.uk/open-data/en-GB

Consumers can search for ratings at:

www.food.gov.uk/ratings

Examples

There are a number of app outlets offering hygiene rating apps based on our data – have a search of Apple, Android, Windows, BlackBerry, for example. Also, there are a number of websites. Search for ‘food hygiene ratings’ to find these. Can you think of a potential social media application? For example, a Facebook check-in at a restaurant displays the restaurant’s rating on a map?

  1. Allergy alerts and food alerts (RSS feed)

allergy alert

About allergy alerts

Peanuts, egg, milk, fish are some of the 14 major allergens and when allergy labelling is incorrect on a food product, or if there’s another food allergy risk, the food product has to be withdrawn from sale or recalled to protect consumers. Food allergic reactions range from mild to very serious. Most people are not allergic to all 14 allergens and we know affected individuals would benefit enormously if they could get alerts for the allergen that they are affected by, straight to their preferred social media feed.

Get allergy alerts

www.food.gov.uk/news-updates/allergynews-rss

About food alerts

If there’s a problem with a food product (such as it contains pieces of metal or a nasty food bug) then that means it should not be sold and might be withdrawn (taken off the shelves) or recalled (customers are asked to return the product for a refund).

Get food alerts

www.food.gov.uk/foodalerts-rss

  1. Audit of meat establishments (CSV format)

About the data

Slaughterhouses (abattoirs), meat cutting plants and wild game handling establishments are audited by us to make sure that they are:

  •         complying with food law requirements
  •         meeting relevant standards in relation to public health and, in slaughterhouses, animal health and welfare

More information at www.food.gov.uk/business-industry/meat/audit

Get data

www.food.gov.uk/sites/default/files/csv/fbo-audits-completed-on-after-november-2012.csv

Example

Search web for ‘meat audit app’.

  1. UK local authority enforcement data (CSV format)

About the data

If something goes wrong or the risks become too high, local authorities can take enforcement action against a food business – closure, seizure of food, a simple caution, or a prosecution, for example. Data showing food law enforcement action taken is available in CSV format for the past four years up to 2013/14.

Get it

www.food.gov.uk/enforcement/monitoring/laems/mondatabyyear/

  1. Food and You survey

food and you

About data

This consumer survey is used to collect information about reported behaviours, attitudes and knowledge relating to food issues. It provides data on people’s reported food purchasing, storage, preparation, consumption and factors that may affect these, such as eating habits, influences on where respondents choose to eat out and experiences of food poisoning

Get data and user guide

www.food.gov.uk/food-and-you

www.food.gov.uk/sites/default/files/csv/2014-food-and-you-survey.csv

www.food.gov.uk/sites/default/files/food-and-you-csv-data-user-guide_0.xls

Example

It can be used for marketing to target food messages to the right groups through the relevant channel.

Keep connected

Join the conversation at @foodgov using #opendata

Be our Facebook community food.gov.uk/facebook

Watch our videos food.gov.uk/youtube

Get our news by RSS food.gov.uk/rss

Get our news by email food.gov.uk/email

Enjoy the weekend guys!